Course Catalog of Department of Computer Science & Engineering

Foundation & Basic Science Courses:

PHY 117: Physics –I
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Mechanics: Measurements, Motion in one dimension or in a plane, Work, Power and Energy, Circular Motion, Simple Harmonic motion, Rotation of Rigid bodies, Centripetal Force, Structure of Matter, Mechanical Properties of Materials. Properties of Matter: Elasticity, Stresses and Strains, Young’s Modulus, Bulk Modulus, Rigidity Modulus, Elastic Limit, Poisson’s Ratio, Relation between Elastic Constants, Bending of Beams. Fluid motion, Equation of continuity, Bernoulli’s Theorem, Viscosity, stokes’ Law, Surface Energy and Surface Tension, Capillary, Determination of Surface Tension Different Methods. Waves and oscillations: Differential equation of simple harmonic oscillator, total energy and average energy, combination of simple harmonic oscillations, spring mass system, torsional pendulum; two body oscillation, reduced mass, damped oscillation, forced oscillation, resonance, progressive wave, power and intensity of wave, stationary wave, group and phase velocities. Thermal Physics: Heat and work- the first law of thermodynamics and its applications; Kinetic Theory of gases- Kinetic interpretation of temperature, specific heats of ideal gases, equipartition of energy, mean free path, Maxwell's distribution of molecular speeds, reversible and irreversible processes, Carnot's cycle, second law thermodynamics, Carnot's theorem, entropy, Thermodynamic functions, Maxwell relations, Clausius and Clapeyron equation.

PHY 118: Physics- Lab I 
0.75 credits, 3 hours/alternative week

Laboratory work based on PHY 117

PHY 127: Physics-II
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Electricity and Magnetism: Electric charge and Coulomb's law, Electric field, concept of electric flux and the Gauss's law- some applications of Gauss's law, Gauss's law in vector form, Electric potential, relation between electric field and electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, gradient, Laplace's and Poisson's equations, Current, Current density, resistivity, the magnetic field, Ampere's law, Biot-Savart law and their applications, Laws of electromagnetic induction- Maxwell's equation. Optics: Theories of light; Interference of light: Young's double slit experiment, displacement of fringes and its uses, Fresnel bi-prism, interference in thin films, Newton's rings, interferometers; Diffraction: Diffraction by single slit, diffraction from a circular aperture, resolving power of optical instruments, diffraction at double slit and N-slits, diffraction grating; polarization: Production and analysis of polarized light, Brewster's law, Malus law. Modern Physics: Galilean relativity and Einstein's special theory of relativity; Lorentz transformation equations, Length contraction, Time dilation and mass-energy relation, photoelectric effect, Compton effect; De Broglie matter waves and its success in explaining Bohr's theory, Pauli's exclusion principle, Constituent of atomic nucleus, Nuclear binding energy, different types of radioactivity, radioactive decay law; Nuclear reactions, nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, atomic power plant.

PHY 128: Physics- Lab II
0.75 credits, 3 hours/alternative week

Laboratory work based on PHY 127

CHM 111: Chemistry I
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Atomic Structure, quantum numbers, electronic configuration, periodic table. Properties and uses of noble gases. Different types of chemical bonds and their properties. Molecular structures of compounds. Selective organic reactions. Different types of solutions and their compositions. Phase rule, phase diagram of monocomponent system. Properties of dilute solutions. Thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium. Ionization of water and pH concept. Electrical properties of solution.

CHM 112: Chemistry- Lab I 
0.75 credits, 3 hours/alternative week

Laboratory work based on CHM 111

BS 103: Bangladesh Studies
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Emergence of Bangladesh, thoughts on socioeconomic development, society, culture & heritage, socioeconomic profile of Bangladesh, agriculture, industry, service sector, demographic patterns, social and physical infrastructures, social stratification and power, power structures, constitution of Bangladesh, government and NGO activities in socioeconomic development, financial administration of GOB, national issues, policies and changing society of Bangladesh.
SCR 103: Professional Ethics
3 credits, 3 hours/week


Definition and scopes of Ethics. Different branches of Ethics. Social change and the emergence of new technologies. History and development of Engineering Ethics. Science & Technology- necessity and application. Study of Ethics in Engineering. Applied Ethics in engineering. Human qualities of an engineer. Obligation of an engineer to the clients and attitude to other engineers. Measures to be taken in order to improve the quality of engineering profession. Ethical Expectations: Employers and Employees; inter-professional relationship: Professional Organization- maintaining a commitment of Ethical standards. Institutionalization of Ethical conduct.

SOC 104: Introduction to Sociology
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Introduction: Society, Science and Technology- an overview; Scientific Study of Society; Social Elements, Society, Community, Association and Institution; Mode of Production and Society Industrial Revolution, Development of Capitalism. Culture and Socialization: Culture; Elements of Culture; Technology and Culture; Cultural Lag; Socialization and Personality; Family; Crime and Deviance; Social Control. Technology, Society and Development; Industrialization and Development; Development and Dependency Theory; Sustainable Development; Development and Foreign Borrowing; Technology Transfer and Globalization, Modernity and Environment; Problem and Prospects. Pre-industrial, Industrial and Post-industrial Society: Common Features of Industrial Society; Development and Types of Social Inequality in Industrial Society; Poverty, Technology and Society; Social Stratification and Social Mobility; Rural and Urban Life, and their Evaluation. Population and Society: Society and Population; Fertility. Mortality and Migration; Science, Technology and Human Migration; Theories of Population Growth-Demographic Transition Theory, Malthusian Population Theory; Optimum Population Theory; Population Policy.

ECO 213: Economics
3 credits, 3 hours/week

The course introduces the concept, basic kinds of economic systems, demand and supply and inter-action of markets, business organization and market structures, the economics of the firm, gross national product, business cycles, unemployment, and inanition, fiscal policy, budget deficits, and the national debt.

MKT 101: Principles of Marketing
3 credits, 3 hours/week

This course deals with the study of concepts, principles and problems involved in the transfer of goods and services from produces to the ultimate consumer. Contents covered include buyer behavior, demand measurement, segmentation, targeting, product life cycle and positioning, product development, pricing, distribution, sales promotion, marketing institutions, marketing strategy and marketing management process. Marketing is the social and managerial process by which individual and group obtains what they need and want, through creation offering, and exchanging product of value with others. Principles of marketing course of design to present marketing environment which includes marketing and changing world, the identification of market. Developing the marketing mix, marketing in special field, international marketing, marketing and society, marketing appraisal and prospects, factor affection the efficiency of marketing.

ACT 110: Principles of Accounting
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Financial Accounting: Objectives and importance of accounting, branches of accounting, accounting as an information system, computerized system and applications in accounting. Recording System: Double entry mechanism, accounts and their classification, accounting equation, accounting cycle journal, ledger, trial balance. Preparation of financial statements considering adjusting and closing entries. Accounting concepts and conventions. Financial statements analysis and interpretation: ration analysis- tests for profitability, liquidity, solvency and overall measure. Costs and Management Accounting: Cost concept and classification. Segregation and mixed cost. Overhead cost: meaning and classification, allocation of overhead cost, overhead recovery method. Job order costing: preparation of job cost sheet and quotation price. Inventory valuation: absorption costing and variable costing technique. Cost volume profit analysis: meaning, breakeven analysis, contribution margin approach, sensitivity analysis. Short-term investment decisions: Relevant and differential cost analysis; Linear programming. Long-term investment decisions: Capital budgeting, various techniques of evaluation of capital investment, investment appraisal under uncertainty, risk management, capital rationing. Concept of working capital, need for working capital, management of cash, stock debtors.


MGT 215: Principles of Management
3 credits, 3 hours/week

The course covers functions of management i.e. planning, organizing, directing, motivating and controlling, problems of organizational goal attainment in differing managerial environments Each management principal and functions is discussed in details. The course deals with management science, theory and practice, management and society, global and comparative management, decision making, the nature and purpose of planning, objectives, strategies, policies and planning premises, political and social environment, organizational structure, departmentalization, line and staff authority, decentralization, effective organizing and organizational culture, managing change through manager and organizational development, human factors of motivation, leadership, committees and group decision making, communication, the system and process of controlling, control techniques and information technology, Productivity and operations management, management change in organization.

MIS 101: Management Information Systems
3 credits, 3 hours/week

This study highlights the effective use of information systems in management builds on a vision-an idea, often not fully articulated, of where a company can go: perhaps new services or unique products it can offer, ways of serving customers better, or ways to help employees be more effective and more satisfied with their work. A vision also means knowing about how things are at the present time. Information describing current events, trends, and likely occurrences help from an image of what could be – opportunities and challenges.

QA 101: Quantitative Analysis (Basic Mathematics & Statistics)
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Number System, Functions & Equations, Geometry (Straight Lines), Indices/exponents & surds, Logarithms, Basic Differentiation & Integration, Permutations & Combinations, Matrices & Determinants.
Statistics: Meaning Statistical Methods of Central Tendency, Correlation & Regression Analysis, Probability, Tests of Hypotheses. 
 

ENG 101: English-I
3 credits, 3 hours/week 

The course aims at developing proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing of English. It is generalized as a remedial course for students whose English need considerable repair and as a foundation courses for ENG 106. The contents include parts of speech, count and uncountable nouns and articles, agreement between subject and verb, adverbs of frequency, term and the sequence of tenses, active arid passive voices, types of sentences, prepositions: time, place, action, directions, questions forms, multi-word verbs, capitalization.

ENG 102: English-II
3 credits, 3 hours/week 

A course to provide solid foundation on study skills in English reading writing, listening comprehension and speaking. The course emphasizes the practice of pronunciation, speed-reading, and effective writing and listening. The course contents include the grammar parts of revision of tenses, use of idioms, prepositions, modals, conditional sentence, use of linking words, use of suffixes and prefixes, synonyms and antonyms, words with multi names, reading parts include the skills in skimming, scanning, selecting information, writing parts include planning, outlining, organizing ideas, topic sentences, paragraph writing, essay writing, job applications, writing reports, writing research-report.

ENG 106: English-III (Scientific Writing & Communication)
3 credits, 3 hours/week 

The course emphasizes on structured writing skill for thesis or report. It will analyze the development of disciplinary writing practices, and will study non-fiction science writing for general audiences. It focuses on referencing method, formulating scientific methodology and idea, report generation. It outlines the development of disciplinary writing strategies and identify how those developments shape, and are shaped by, disciplinary structures; Recognize normative conventions governing scientific writing and their influence on the organization, use, and distribution of scientific knowledge and information; Communicate specialist knowledge and information to non-specialist audiences; Study, critique and apply strategies used in science popularizations; Examine the role of science in public communication and debate.

MATH 115: Math-I (Differential & Integral Calculus)
3 credits, 3 hours/week 

Differential Calculus: Limit, Continuity and differentiability, Successive Differentiation of various types of function, Leibniz’s theorem, Rolle’s theorem, Mean value theorem, Taylor’s theorem in finite and infinite form, Maclaurin’s theorem in finite and infinite form, Langrange’s form of remainders, Cauchy’s  form’s of remainder’s Expansion of function, Evaluation of function-of Hospitals rule, Partial-Differentiation, Euler’s theorem, Tangent & Normal, Determination of minimum and maximum values of function and point of inflexion, Applications, Curvature, Radius of Curvature, Center of curvature. 
Integral Calculus: Definitions of integration, integration of method of substitution, integration by parts, Standard integrals, Integration by the method of successive reduction, Definite integrals, its properties and use in summing series, Walli’s formula, Improper integrals, Beta function and Gamma function, Area under a plane curve in Cartesian and polar co-ordinate’s Trapezoidal rule, Simpson’s rule, arc lengths of curves in Cartesian and polar co-ordinates, parametric and pedal equation, Intrinsic equation, Volumes, of solids of revolutions by shell method, Areas of surface revolution.

MATH 116: Math-II (Ordinary & Partial Differential Equations)
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Ordinary Differential Equation: ordinary differential equation of 1st order, differential equation, variable separable, exact differential equation, Integrating factors, linear differential equation, solution of 2nd order linear differential equation with constant coefficients, solution of homogeneous equations, solutions of 2nd order differential equations when the dependent or independent variables are absent.
Partial Differential Equation: Linear and non-linear 1st order equations, standard forms, linear equations of 2nd order, solution of 2nd order linear differential equation with variable coefficients, wave equations, particular solution with boundary and initial conditions. 

MATH 117: Math-II (Discrete mathematic)
3 credits, 3 hours/week 

Set theory, Elementary number theory, Graph theory, Paths and trees, Generation functions, Algebraic structures, Semi graph, Permutation groups, Binary relation, Mathematical logic, Prepositional calculus and predicate calculus.

MATH 118: Math-III (Linear Algebra & Coordinate Geometry)
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Definition of linear (vector) space, sub space, linear dependence and independence, basis and dimension, linear transformation, rank and nullity, representation of linear transformation by matrices, change matrix, determinant and trace, Eigen vector, Eigen value and Eigen space, normal and canonical form of matrices, matrix polynomials.
Coordinate geometry: Changes of axes, Pair of straight line, System of circle, Ellipse Parabola.

MATH 215: Math-IV (Complex variable & Vector Analysis)
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Complex Variable: Complex number system, General functions of a complex variable, Limit and continuity of a function of complex variable and related theorems, Complex differentiation & the Cauchy-Riemann equations, Mapping by elementary functions, Line integral of a complex function, Cauchy’s theorem, Taylor’s & Laurent’s theorems, Singular points, Residue, Cauchy’s residue theorem, Evaluation of residue, Contour integration, Conformal mapping.
Vectors Analysis: Scalars and vectors, equality of vectors, Addition and subtraction of vectors, Multiplication of vectors by scalars, Scalar and vectors product of two vectors and their geometrical interpretation, Triple products and multiple products, Linear dependence and independence of vectors together with elementary application, definition of line, surface and volume integrals, Gradient, divergence and curl of point function, Various formulae, Gauss’s theorem, Stroke’s theorem, Green’s theorem.

CSE 111: Computer Fundamentals 
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Introduction to computations; early history of computing devices; computers; major components of a computer; Hardware: processor, memory, I/O devices; software: Operating system, application software; Basic architecture of a computer; Basic Information Technology; the Internet, Basic programming concepts: Number system: binary, octal, hexadecimal, decimal; binary arithmetic, program development stages, flow charts, programming constructs: data types, operators, expressions, statements, control statements, functions, array.


Computer Science Courses:


CSE 111: Computer Fundamentals 
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Introduction to computations; early history of computing devices; computers; major components of a computer; Hardware: processor, memory, I/O devices; software: Operating system, application software; Basic architecture of a computer; Basic Information Technology; the Internet, Basic programming concepts: Number system: binary, octal, hexadecimal, decimal; binary arithmetic, program development stages, flow charts, programming constructs: data types, operators, expressions, statements, control statements, functions, array.

CSE 112: Computer Fundamentals - Lab
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on CSE 111.

CSE 112: Structured Programming Languages 
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Programming concepts; Structured programming language: data types, operators, expressions, control structures; Functions and program structure: parameter passing conventions, scope rules and storage classes, recursion; Header files; Preprocessor; Pointers and arrays; Strings, multidimensional array, User defined data types: structures, unions, enumerations; Input and Output: standard input and output, formatted input and output, file access; Variable length argument list; Command line parameters; Error Handling; Graphics, Linking, library functions.

CSE 122: Structured Programming Language - Lab
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on CSE 121

CSE 211: Object Oriented Programming
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Philosophy of Object Oriented Programming (OOP); Advantages of OOP over structured programming; Encapsulation, classes and objects, access specifiers, static and non-static members; Constructors, destructors and copy constructors;. Array of objects, object pointers, and object references; Inheritance: single and multiple inheritance; Polymorphism: overloading, abstract classes, virtual functions and overriding; Exceptions; Object Oriented I/O; Template functions and classes; Multi-threaded Programming. 
Reference languages: C++ and Java.
CSE 212: Object Oriented Programming - Lab
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on CSE 211

CSE 217: Data Structure
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Internal data representation; Abstract data types; Elementary data structures: arrays, lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs; Advanced data Structures: heaps, Fibonacci heaps, B-trees; Recursion, sorting, searching, hashing, storage management.

CSE 218: Data Structure - Lab
0.75 credits, 3 hours/alternative week

Laboratory work based on CSE 217

CSE 221: Database Management
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Concepts of data base systems, Models: Entity-Relationship model, Relational model; Relational algebra; SQL; Integrity constraint; Relational database design; File organization and retrieval, file indexing; Transaction manager; Concurrency controller; Recovery manager; Security system; Database administration; Advanced database management systems: distributed, multimedia, object-oriented, object-relational; Some applications using SQL.

CSE 222: Database management - Lab
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on CSE 217

CSE 227: Algorithm
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Techniques for analysis of algorithms; Methods for the design of efficient algorithms: divide and conquer, greedy method, dynamic programming, back tracking, branch and bound; Basic search and traversal techniques; Topological sorting; Connected components, spanning trees, shortest paths; Flow algorithms; Approximation algorithms; Parallel algorithms; Algebraic simplification and transformations; Lower bound theory; NP-completeness, NP-hard and NP-complete problems.

CSE 228: Algorithm - Lab
0.75 credits, 3 hours/alternative week

Laboratory work based on CSE 227


CSE 231: Operating System Concepts
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Principles of operating systems, design objectives, sequential processes, concurrent processes, concurrency, functional mutual exclusion, processor cooperation and deadlocks, processor management, control and scheduling of large information processing systems, resource allocation, dispatching, processor access methods, job control languages, memory management, memory addressing, paging and store multiplexing, multiprocessing and time sharing, batch processing, scheduling algorithms, file systems, protection and security, design and implementation methodology, performance evaluation and case studies.

CSE 232: Operating system Concepts - Lab
0.75 credits, 3 hours/alternative week

Laboratory work based on CSE 231

CSE 311: System Analysis & Design
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Information, general concepts of formal information systems, analysis of information requirements for modern organizations, modem data processing technology and its application, information systems structures, designing information outputs, classifying and coding data, physical storage media considerations, logical data organization, systems analysis, general systems design, detail system design, project management and documentation, group development of an information system project: includes all phases of software life cycles from requirement analysis to the completion of a fully implemented system.

CSE 312: System Analysis & Design- Lab
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on CSE 311

CSE 321: Software Engineering
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Concepts of software engineering: requirements, definition, modularity, structured design, data specifications, functional specifications, verification, documentation, software maintenance, Software support tools, Software project organization, quality assurance, management and communication skills.


CSE 322: Software Engineering - Lab
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on CSE 321

CSE 331: Pattern Recognition
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Pattern Recognition: introduction, importance. Statistical and Neural Pattern Recognition: Bayesian classifier, Bayes decision theory, discriminant functions and decision surfaces, Bayesian classifier for normal distributions; Linear classifiers: discriminant functions and decision hyperplanes, perceptron algorithm, least squares methods; Nonlinear classifiers: two and three layer perceptrons, backp-ropagation algorithm; Template matching: optimal path searching techniques, dynamic programming methods, correlation methods; Context dependent classification: observable and hidden Markov models, Viterbi algorithm.

CSE 332 : Numerical Method
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Introduction; Solution of algebraic and transcendental equations: method of iteration, False Position method, Newton-Rhapson method; Solution of simultaneous linear equations: Cramer's rule, Iteration method, Gauss-Jordan Elimination method, Choleski's process; Interpolation: diagonal and horizontal difference, differences of a polynomial, Newton's formula for forward and backward interpolation, Spline interpolation; Numerical differentiation and integration; 
Solution of ordinary differential equations: Euler's method, Picard's method, Milne's method, Taylor's series method, Runge-Kutta method; Least squares approximation of functions: linear and polynomial regression, fitting exponential and trigonometric functions.

CSE 341: Artificial intelligence
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Introduction to new and old AI, Knowledge representation, Propositional and first order logic, inference in first order logic, Frame problem, Search techniques in AI, Game playing, Planning, Probabilistic reasoning, Learning in symbolic and non-symbolic representation, Natural language processing. Introduction to expert system.

CSE 342: Artificial Intelligence - Lab
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on CSE 341

CSE 411: Compiler Design
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Introduction to compiling, Basic issues, Lexical analysis, Syntax analysis, Syntax directed translation, Semantic analysis: type-checking, Run-time environments, Intermediate code generation, Code generation, Code optimization.

CSE 412: Compiler Design - Lab
0.75 credits, 3 hours/alternative week

Laboratory work based on CSE 411

CSE 413: Computer Graphics
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Graphics hardware: display devices, input devices etc; Basic raster graphics algorithms for drawing 2D primitives; Two-dimensional and three-dimensional viewing, clipping and transformations; Three-dimensional object representations: polygon surface, B-Spline curves and surfaces, BSP trees, Octrees, Fractal-Geometry methods; Visible surface detection methods: Z-buffer method, BSP tree method, Ray casting method; Illumination models; Surface rendering methods: polygon rendering, ray tracing, terrain visualization with height mapping, modeling surface details with texture mapping; Color models; Computer animation.

CSE 414: Computer Graphics - Lab
0.75 credits, 3 hours/alternative week

Laboratory work based on CSE 413

CSE 415: Simulation & Modeling
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Simulation methods, model building, random number generator, statistical analysis of results, validation and verification techniques, Digital simulation of continues system, Simulation and analytical methods for analysis of computer systems and practical problems in business and practice, introduction to simulation packages.

CSE 416: Simulation & Modeling - Lab
0.75 credits, 3 hours/alternative week

Laboratory work based on CSE 415

 

Computer Engineering Courses:

EEE: 113: Electrical Engineering
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Fundamental electrical concepts and measuring units. Direct current: voltage, current, resistance and power. Laws of electrical circuits and methods of network analysis; Introduction to magnetic circuits. Alternating current: instantaneous and r.m.s. current, voltage and power, average power for various combinations of R, L and C circuits, phasor representation of sinusoidal quantities.

EEE: 114: Electrical Engineering - Lab
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on EEE 113

CSE 213: Digital Logic Design
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Number systems and codes, Oigitaliogic, Boolean algebra, Dc-morgan’s law, logic gates and their truth tables, canonical forms, Combinational logic circuits, minimization techniques, Arithmetic and data handling logic circuits, decoders and encoders, Multiplexers and demultiplexers, Combinational Circuit design, Flip-flops, race around problems, Counters: asynchronous counters, synchronous counters and their applications, TTL, MOS, CMOS, IIL logic gates and their circuits, PLA design, Synchronous and asynchronous logic design: state diagram, Mealy and Moore machines, State. minimizations and assignments, pulse mode logic, Fundamental mode design.

CSE 214: Digital Logic Design - Lab
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on CSE 213


CSE 223: Digital Electronics and pulse Technique
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Diode logic gates, transistor switches, transistor gates, MOS gates, Logic families: TTL, ECL, III and CMOS logic with operation details, Propagation delay, product and noise immunity, Open collector and high impedance gates, Electronic circuits for flip-flops, counters and register, memory systems, PLA’s. AID, D/A converters with applications, SIH circuits, LED, LCD find optically coupled oscillators, Non-linear applications of OP AMPs, Analogue switches.
Linear wave shaping: doide wave shaping techniques, clopping and clamping circuits, comparator druids, switching circuits, pulse transformers, pulse transmission, pulse generation, monostable, bistable and astable multivibrators, Schmitt trigger, blocking oscillators and time-base circuit, Timing circuits, Simple voltage sweeps, linear current sweeps.

CSE 224: Digital Electronics and pulse Technique - Lab 
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on CSE 223

CSE 233: Computer Organization and Assembly Programming
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Computer Organization: Fundamentals of computer design, Performance and cost, Instruction set design and examples, Measurements, Basic processor implementation techniques: 1-Iardwired and micro-programmed control; Caches and multiprocessor caches, Design I/O systems, I/O performances, Micro-programmed control, Multiprocessors with examples Assembly Language: Machine and Assembly instruction types and their formats, : character representation instructions, instruction execution, Machine language programming, !instruction sets and their implementations, The assembly process, Addressing methods, Subroutines, macros and files, i/o programming, interrupts and concurrent processes.

CSE 234: Computer Organization and Assembly Programming Lab
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on CSE 233

CSE 313: Computer Architecture
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Information representation; Measuring performance; Instructions and data access methods: operations and operands of computer hardware, representing instruction, addressing styles; Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU) operations, floating point operations, designing ALU; Processor design: datapaths - single cycle and multicycle implementations; Control Unit design - hardwared and microprogrammed; Hazards; Exceptions; Pipeline: pipelined datapath and control, superscalar and dynamic pipelining; Memory organization: cache, virtual memory; channels; DMA and Interrupts; Buses; Multiprocessors: types of multiprocessors, performance, single bus multiprocessors, multiprocessors connected by network, clusters.

CSE 323: Computer Networks
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Protocol hierarchies; Data link control: HLDC; DLL in Internet; DLL of ATM; LAN Protocols: Standards IEEE 802.*; Switches and Hubs, Bridges, FDDI, Fast Ethernet; Routing algorithm; Congestion control; Internetworking, WAN; Fragmentation; Firewalls; IPV4, IPV6, ARP, RARP, Mobile IP, Network layer of ATM; Transport protocols; Transmission control protocol: connection management, transmission policy, congestion control, timer management; UDP; AAL of ATM; 

CSE 324: Computer Networks- Lab
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on CSE 323

CSE 301 Data Communication 
3 credits, 3 hours/week 

Fourier transforms; Modulation techniques: AM, FM, PM, OOK, FSK, PSK, QPSK, 
QAM; Pulse modulation- PCM, PPM, PAM, Delta modulation; Companding; Equalizers; 
Echo cancellation; Inter-symbol interference; TDM, FDM; Error due to noise; Concept of 
channel coding and capacity.

CSE 333: Computer Peripherals and interfacing
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Literature components and their characteristics, microprocessor I/O Disk, Drums and Printers, Optical displays and sensors, high power interface devices, transducers, stepper motors and peripheral devices.

CSE 334: Computer Peripherals and Interfacing - Lab
1.50 credits, 3 hours/week

Laboratory work based on CSE 333

CSE 421: Microprocessor
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Microprocessor: Introduction to different types of microprocessors. Microprocessor architecture, instruction set interfacing, I/O operation, interrupt structure, DMA, Microprocessor interface ICs, Advanced microprocessor concept I microprocessor based system design.

CSE 422: Microprocessor - Lab
0.75 credits, 3 hours/alternative week

Laboratory work based on CSE 421

CSE 423: Electrical and Electronics Devices 
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Introduction to three phase circuits, alternators and transformers, principles of operation or DC, synchronous, induction, universal, and stepper motors, Thyristor and microprocessor based speed control of motors. Differential, logarithmic and chopper amplifiers, Frequency and voltage measurements using digital techniques, Recorders and display devices, spectrum analyzers and logic analyzers, Data acquisition and interfacing to microprocessor based systems, Transducers: terminology, types, principles and application of photovoltaic, piezoelectric, thermoelectric, variable reactance and opto-electronic transducers, Noise reduction in instrumentation.

CSE 425: VLSI Design
3 credits, 3 hours/week

VLSI design methodology: top-down design approach, technology trends. NMOS, CMOS inverters pass transistor and pass gates: DC and transient characteristics. Brief overview of fabrication process: NMOS, CMOS, Bi-CMOS process; NMOS and CMOS layout, stick diagram and design rules; CMOS circuit characteristics and performance estimation: resistance and capacitance, rise and fall time, power estimation; Buffer circuit design. Introduction to Bi-CMOS circuits; Complex CMOS gates; CMOS building block: multiplexer, barrel shifter, adder, counter, multipliers.

CSE 427: Optical Fiber Communication
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Principles of fiber optical communication & network, Point to point systems & shared medium networks, Fiber propagation including attenuation, Dispersion and nonlinearities, erbium-doped amplifiers, Bragg and ling period grating, Fiber transmission based on solitolls and non-return to zero and time and wavelength division-multiplexed networks.

CSE 429: Mobile and Telecommunications
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Introduction: Concept, evaluation and fundamentals of cellular telephony, mobile standards, mobile system architecture, design, performance and operation. Voice digitization and modulation techniques; Cellular radio system: Frequency reuse, co channel interference, diversity techniques. Fundamentals of telecommunication systems, evaluation, exchange and international regulatory boundaries. Telephone apparatus: microphone, speakers, ringer, pulse and tone dialing mechanism, side tone mechanism. Trucking and queuing switching technologies, the design and analysis of telecommunication networks.

CSE 431: Fault Tolerance Systems
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Introduction to Fault Tolerance Systems and Architectures, Fault detection and location in combinational and sequential circuits, Fault test generation for combinational and sequential circuits, Digital simulation as a diagnostic tool, Automatic test pattern generator, Fault modeling, automatic test equipment, Faults in memory, memory test pattern and reliability, Performance self checking circuits, Burst error correction and Triple modular redundancy, Maintenance processor.

CSE 433: Information Security
3 credits, 3 hours/week

Introduction to Cryptography, DES, IDEA, public key algorithm; Authentication; Digital signatures; SSL, SSH, and IPSec, TCP/IP concepts, protocols, security best practices, intrusion detection products, traffic analysis, planning and placement of intrusion detection solutions.

CSE 400: Project & Thesis
6 hours in a week, 3.00 Cr.

All candidates are required to undertake supervised study and research culminating in a Thesis Project in their fields of specialization.